Chemistry, Hot-shooting, and a Blowout: Heat-Spurs Game 3 Recap

Heat team dynamic

For all the scrutiny surrounding LeBron James’ supporting cast in these playoffs, the superstar MVP finally received a considerable amount of assistance on Tuesday night. The ailing Dwayne Wade got off to a fantastic start, and after several efficient trips on the offensive end, the shooting guard frankly should have shouldered more of the ball control. Wade’s shot and distributive efforts were spot on to begin the night, a surprising and reassuring effort that could not be paralleled by his fellow teammate, LeBron, who converted on one measly 6-foot jumper at the 3:24 mark in all of the 1st quarter action. The MVP went on to net only 2 more points in the 1st half, and along with 4 assists, marked a gruesome 1st-half performance.

Wade’s production waned as the game progressed, but the fault is not necessarily directed at him. Chris Bosh prolonged his struggle on Tuesday, meaning Wade would receive all the defensive attention. Yet had LeBron averted his passive attitude (literally and figuratively), he may have provided essential support for Wade that would undoubtedly aid both of their play for the rest of the game. Even the sharp-shooting Mike Miller, as well as the ball of energy that is Norris Cole, pitched in valuable efforts in the first 2 1/2 quarters that kept Miami in the game–in spite of LeBron’s no-show. One could only imagine how Game 3 might have turned out if LeBron actually played like himself: the unstoppable, MVP force that takes control of contests like no other.

Shooting Spurs

If you happen to dabble in fantasy basketball, you couldn’t say the performances of Danny Green and Gary Neal were TOO surprising: their three-point totals and explosive scoring stretches caught many an eye during the regular season. Nevertheless, the play of Green and Neal on Tuesday is one for the ages, and certainly meets the lofty standards of Spurs playoff lore. The barrage of 3’s en route to taking a 2-1 series lead resonates on a level beyond the stat sheet, as it ignited an oftentimes dormant San Antonio crowd. With the majority of the punishing damage coming in the 3rd quarter, Green/Neal combined to shoot 18 for 32 (56%), and a gaudy 13 for 19 (68%) beyond the arc. Perhaps most importantly, their stellar performances nicely made up for mediocre play from their fellow teammates: the terrific trio of Duncan, Parker, and Ginobili, who surprisingly could only muster a paltry 10-23 combined shooting night. The three veterans could only convert on 1-5 3-PT field goals, and even went a horrid 4-9 at the charity stripe.

Keep in mind that these faces of the Spurs franchise are about as good as it gets as making adjustments from game to game, which will come of use in the NBA finals: in other words, don’t expect any more low-key performances from the trio, who will also definitely play more than 30 minutes in the coming games (a mark none of the three surpassed on Tuesday). And even if Duncan, Parker, or Ginobili don’t regroup in time to establish a significant impact on the series, they faithfully leave the reigns in young, potent (as we saw Game 3) hands.

Observations in a blowout

Perhaps Gregg Popovich was trying to send a message, through–gasp–allowing for his players to have a little fun by piling on the score in the 3rd quarter. Or maybe Miami already had one step outside of the AT&T Center and had no intentions on looking back until Thursday. Or it may have been that the explosive Danny Green/Gary Neal tandem was divinely possessed, and the continual onslaught of 3-pointers were simply a natural feat. Whatever the case may be, the blowout witnessed on Tuesday seemed a bit different.

Usually, in an telepathic act of mutual consent, opposing coaches take out their players–and toss out their will to compete any longer–once the scoring margin exceeds 20. But once a blowout was brewing towards the latter part of the 3rd quarter, the Spurs attack on the basket hardly ceased, as it seemed natural for the basketball to glide into the hoop. In most cases, in games following a blowout, any notion of a huge disparity between two teams halts going into the next game. Of course, that comes after the 4th quarter (and maybe even some of the 3rd) instantly transforms into garbage time: stars are benched, the crowd calms down, and the excitement ventilating throughout the stadium evaporates. That was clearly not the case on Tuesday, as the home crowd fervor only grew towards the end of the game, corresponding with a growth in San Antonio’s lead. Perhaps this means the Spurs’ momentous, blowout victory could have lasting effects in this series, as the aura surrounding the NBA Finals series could shift towards San Antonio’s advantage.

Another lesser point in this Game 3 eruption is how the Spurs’ heroes conducted themselves in light of a Miami blowout just days earlier. The NBA world surely has gotten to know LeBron’s overpowering stuff of Tiago Splitter’s dunk attempt on Sunday night, a point that really highlighted the Heat blowout. James, instead of sprinting back on defense like a non-egotistical person, gladly soaked in the moment, as he pretentiously observed his surroundings and happily gloated. This provided a stark contrast from how the likes of Game 3 stars Danny Green and Gary Neal carried themselves. After each one of their crowd-arousing 3-point shots went through the net, Green and Neal immediately scampered back on defense, and kept a blank, but intensely focused, expression on their face. The most you could get out of Green at least was a grin and a jump or two (going into timeouts), occurring towards the end of his shooting streak.

This serves as yet another reason of why so many despise the Miami Heat and all that its brand constantly expresses. So much for LeBron being a changed man, and experiencing his “epiphany” (a story that graced a Sports Illustrated cover a year ago). And if that’s not what he included under “change”, he might want to reconsider what truly defines him not just as a basketball player, but as a person and role model.

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