2014 NBA Finals Game 2: Analysis

Chalmers's elbow shot on Parker warranted a flagrant foul. (USATSI)

Chalmers’s elbow shot on Parker warranted a flagrant foul. (USATSI)

A Cheap Shot, A Game Changed 

Mario Chalmers’s egregiously winded-up, cheap shot elbow to the stomach of Tony Parker not only permanently disoriented the point guard who had just re-entered the game 18 seconds ago, but following the pause in the game caused by the technical foul, took a toll on the Spurs’ psyche. San Antonio failed to recover thereafter, neither in their immediate four free throw opportunities (all missed), nor down the stretch: the team shot 2-7 with only six points in the remaining period, excluding the futile Manu Ginobili three-point jumper at the buzzer. The incident also plays into the bigger picture of Miami’s “questionable” (at best) style of play, regularly engaging in histrionics and exaggeration–colloquially called flopping–as both Dwayne Wade and Chalmers did earlier in the contest, as well as taking the occasional cheap shot at an opponent. This tendency is in fact utterly incomprehensible: why resort to such morally low and basketball-disparaging methods, when you have an unstoppable and overpowering freight train of a basketball player–and the world’s best player–in LeBron James at your side? Nevertheless, therein lies the reason for why so commonly the NBA world allies against the Heat, and why Miami incites a tremendous amount of hatred–and not so much because of their successes and dominance.

Evolution Of Bosh

Resounding, bounce-back responses to previous game defeats have characterized the Miami Heat’s reign over the NBA in the past year. But while LeBron James leads the charge in this type of scenario, frequently experiencing scoring outbursts and increasing his influence on the game, the superstar’s ability to take control late in a contest remains inconsistent. So for converted-center Chris Bosh–usually regarded as the lesser of Miami’s “big three”–to sink the go-ahead three pointer in Game 2, it’s huge, and will serve as a huge psychological lift for the rest of the series (particularly for LeBron, who now can lessen or even pass off his clutch-time responsibilities). Furthermore, it highlights the dimension Bosh has recently added to his repertoire: the three-point shot. Sure it extends his NBA career for a few seasons, but in the present, it has the effect of nicely complementing the play of his star teammate James, and adds another layer to the team’s offensive arsenal.

Beaten At Their Own Game

If the Spurs will have any shot to dethrone their Finals opponents–and complete the crucial task of taking at least one of the next two games in Miami–they must win the battle in the paint. With Tim Duncan, Boris Diaw, and Tiago Splitter, San Antonio has the clear advantage in the low block both offensively and defensively, therefore making Miami’s 44-34 points-in-the-paint victory simply inexcusable. Adding in Tony Parker, and his driving-layup ability and craftiness around the basket, there’s no reason for the Spurs not to use their superiority in the paint to the fullest, and impact the game to their favor from that space on the floor. The Heat not only out-shot the Spurs in this area, but also somehow managed to out-muscle them, having the better edge of total rebounds by a tally of 38-37. It only further speaks to the critical necessity for San Antonio to regain dominance down low–and how influential a factor this paint battle really is–which players and coach Gregg Popovich will assuredly keen in on during the time until Game 3 in Miami.

Leonard (2) will seek to better restrain LeBron in Game 3. (Photo by Andrew D Bernstein/NBAE via Getty Images)

Leonard (2) will seek to better restrain LeBron in Game 3. (Photo by Andrew D Bernstein/NBAE via Getty Images)

Leonard’s Liability

Third-year small forward Kawhi Leonard has been tasked with containing LeBron James from the start of the series (and to some extent, assumed the same duty in last year’s Finals too), so it’s imperative for him to play defense shrewdly in order to remain in the game as long as possible–and not succumb to foul trouble like in Game 2, which freed up LeBron, allowed him to face and exploit mismatches, and ultimately develop the rhythm that paved the way for a 35-point performance. Though fouling out with just 47 seconds left in the game, Leonard constantly felt dragged down by his high foul total throughout the course of the game, either having to take a seat on the bench, or not guarding LeBron as aggressively and effectively as he usually would while on the floor. Looking ahead to the remainder of the series, Leonard must act more judiciously in his defensive challenges, and especially avoid debatable contact in the latter stages of games, having committed six of his eight defensive fouls during the last two games of the series in the second half of play. As long as Leonard puts forth an unhindered defensive effort, compounded with well-timed help defense from his teammates, the Spurs have the capacity to mitigate LeBron’s impact and force him into taking contested  jump-shots.

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